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Press Mentions

Young adults aging out of foster care face unique challenges during COVID-19

October 19, 2020

For young people in foster care, the uncharted times of coronavirus are even more unsettling.

“To enter a world in which people are more isolated and less available to provide support ... because there's a looming threat in the form of the virus can intensify those beliefs that they've come to develop through their childhood trauma,” Jamie Howard, PhD said.

While kids legally become adults at age 18, this is just the beginning of another developmental period called emerging adulthood, Howard explained.

More at Today Show (online)
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5 Ways Families Can Prepare as Coronavirus Cases Surge

October 19, 2020

Dr. Harold S. Koplewicz discusses ways to preserve your family’s mental health.

More at The New York Times
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Advice on talking to your family about the new normal in holiday gatherings

October 19, 2020

Dave Anderson on advice on talking to your family about the new normal in holiday gatherings.

More at WGN Chicago
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How to celebrate Halloween with your kids responsibly

October 9, 2020

“Halloween is usually really fun for kids because there’s candy involved, they’re seeing friends, and there’s a lot of things to get excited about,” says Dr. Heather Berenstein, a Psychologist in Mood Disorders at the Child Mind Institute. “When that gets taken away for a reason that is hard to understand, hard for anyone to understand… then they’re not going to fully understand why.” Luckily, there are ways to celebrate the holiday without ignoring or even minimizing the dangers of the Covid-19 pandemic. The CDC has written up specific guidelines that you can use to have a holiday that is both fulfilling and safe, and we’ve elaborated on some of their suggestions for low-risk activities below.

More at San Francisco Chronicle
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4 Questions To Gauge Your Kid’s Mental Health During The COVID-19 Pandemic

October 8, 2020

“Parents have to keep in mind that kids aren’t necessarily thinking about everything that is happening right now in the exact same way they’re thinking about it,” explained Jill Emanuele, clinical director of the Child Mind Institute’s Mood Disorders Center. “It’s really important to start with general, open questions.”

More at Huffington Post
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Child Psychologist Tells Parents Not To Be Too Involved With Kids During Remote Classes, Says Helicopter Parenting May Cause More Problems

October 8, 2020

Dr. Rachel Busman, a psychologist with the Child Mind Institute, said if you observe your child not answering a teacher’s question fast enough, just give them more time. “They need to learn and they also need to be given space to continue to be independent, problem solve and navigate the environment themselves,” Dr. Busman said.

More at CBS2 New York
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How Pandemic Is Impacting Your Kids’ Mental Health (And How To Help Them)

October 8, 2020

Dr. Jamie Howard talks to Today. Growing up through your tweens and teens isn’t easy, and the coronavirus pandemic has made it even more of a challenge. Launching a new series, Mental Health in America, NBC investigative and consumer correspondent Vicky Nguyen joins TODAY with advice for parents on how to help their kids through a difficult time.

More at Today
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Remote learning: How parents can keep children focused and engaged this school year

October 2, 2020

Any ideal home workspace for a student should be “clear of all distractions, including television and other non-essential screens,” Dr. Laura Phillips, a clinical neuropsychologist at the nonprofit Child Mind Institute, tells Fox News.

More at Fox News
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Screen time is up—and so is cyberbullying: How to recognise the signs, and help your kids

October 2, 2020

Clinical psychologist Jamie Howard recalls talking to a mother recently who noticed her daughter was staying in her bedroom and crying often. The teen finally revealed that all her friends had formed a separate group chat without her and had become anxious about why they excluded her and what they were saying behind her back. “We had her strengthen other friendships and make new friends to rebuild her self-esteem and remind her that she’s very likable,” says Howard, who specialises in anxiety and mood disorders at the Child Mind Institute. “We got her doing more dance, walking her dog—more activity that naturally brings about self-confidence.”

More at National Geographic
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How parents can help children cope with the Halloween disappointment

September 30, 2020

"Halloween is one more thing we have to wrap our heads around," said Dr. Heather Bernstein, clinical psychologist at the Child Mind Institute. Bernstein said engaging in a dialogue about your child's disappointment over traditional Halloween activities being canceled is key in understanding how to deal with the Halloween downer.

More at CBS8 – SanDiego