“There is a loss of the freedom and fun of the weekend that affects kids, too,” says Jamie Howard, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist at the Child Mind Institute, a nonprofit dedicated to childhood mental health in New York City. Just like with adults, though, it can run deeper than simply feeling bummed out about losing movie nights and pancake breakfasts. In some situations, the Sunday Scaries are a manifestation of problems at school, whether it’s struggling with academics, a learning disability, or bullying, Howard says. While teens might be able to articulate their complaints, “Younger kids often speak through their behavior,” she says. Tip-offs include a drastic change in their behavior or, at an extreme, a refusal to go to school. Little kids might also express anxiety through physical complaints, like talking about stomachaches.