Project UROK FAQ

Here are answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about the Project UROK initiative.

Is it safe?

Yes. Project UROK screens all videos before they’re uploaded. Video submissions may not contain locations, full names, hate speech or anything that advocates self-harm, suicide or violence. We don’t want to glamourize mental illness — we just want to create an honest portrayal of it.

We also monitor comments across all platforms — YouTube, our website, social media — very carefully, and reserve the right to hide any inappropriate comments and to block any offending users. We will not accept video submissions that have been previously made public.

If you have reason to believe that it is dangerous for your child’s story to be online, please contact us at urok@childmind.org and let us know.

How can I get involved?

Great question! You can donate, make a video, write a blog, like/follow us on social media, share our posts, and if you know any teenagers or young adults who would benefit from hearing these stories, or would like to tell their own stories, direct them to our site!

Who can upload videos?

Anyone with a YouTube account can submit a video, and all submitted videos are reviewed by the Project UROK team to make sure they fit our guidelines before they are released.

What are the guidelines for videos?

All videos should be 2-3 minutes long, and may not reveal the locations or full names of anyone under the age of 18. (Of course, we don’t require that anyone reveal their full name.) They may not contain any hate speech or anything that advocates self-harm, suicide or violence. They must be unpublished or unlisted and must be sent to us for approval before we publish them on YouTube.

What if I don’t want my child’s video to be published?

Anyone with a YouTube account can submit a video. We rely on YouTube’s guidelines, which permit anyone who is 13 years of age or older to open an account and publish material. Of course, if you have any questions or concerns about your child’s safety we urge you to contact us. You might find YouTube’s page on parents’ concerns about children sharing videos useful; it includes safety tips from Google and Common Sense Media.

If you have reason to believe that it is dangerous for your child’s story to be online, please contact us at urok@childmind.org and let us know.