The Child Mind Institute is proud to observe Black, Indigenous, and People of Color Mental Health Month this July.

In past years, July has been designated as Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, but this year we’re joining our peers in the mental health community and making a change. Going forward we will use language that better honors the experiences and identities of BIPOC (including Latinx) individuals and families as important and empowering.

Mental Health America explains the importance of this change:

“The continued use of “minority or marginalized” sets up BIPOC communities in terms of their quantity instead of their quality and removes their personhood…The word “minority” also emphasizes the power differential between “majority” and “minority” groups and can make BIPOC feel as though “minority” is synonymous with inferiority. …The words the mental health community uses need to change in order to help communities understand how these terms create and perpetuate negative images and stereotypes of individuals that identify as BIPOC. By including “BI” Black and Indigenous in addition to “POC” people of color, we are honoring the unique experiences of Black and Indigenous individuals and their communities, as well as the spectrum of existence and experience by POC.” – Mental Health America

The trauma of racial injustice has significant, long-term impacts on the mental health of BIPOC communities and these same communities frequently lack access to high-quality, culturally conscious mental health care.

The Child Mind Institute is committed to doing our part to change that. We are expanding our programs and building new resources to better meet the mental health needs of BIPOC children and families.

For further information and mental health support tailored for BIPOC, we encourage you to explore the following resources: