In some ways, the worst thing about Junior Seau’s suicide earlier this week was put into words by former Giants linebacker Harry Carson: “When I heard it, I have to say in the past I would have been shocked. But I’m not shocked anymore.”

Seau was a beloved player, known for his passion and for being on the 1994 San Diego Chargers team that won the AFC championship. Along with mourning there is obvious speculation that Seau may be yet another casualty of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a neurodegenerative disease linked to concussions and characterized by dementia and depression.

Seau’s suicide was chillingly reminiscent of fellow former NFL player Dave Duerson who, like Seau, shot himself in the chest. Duerson also left a note requesting that his brain be given to the NFL’s brain bank for evaluation, and researchers later confirmed that Duerson was indeed suffering from CTE. Seau’s family has agreed to have his brain studied, too.

But the list of professional football players who have committed suicide is increasingly horrifying; Carson, who says he still suffers the effects of concussions he sustained during his career, cited Andre Waters and Ray Easterling, who killed himself on April 19.

We may find that Seau was suffering from CTE at the time of his death, or we may find that he wasn’t. His suicide is a tragedy either way. And the connection between the disease and football is well established, and shouldn’t be ignored. We are able to help people suffering from depression, but we can’t undo the brain damage once it has happened. This is why it’s important for us to focus on the children in upcoming generations who will be playing football: let’s make sure they inherit the sport but not the disease.

For a great memorial of Junior Seau, check out Deadspin’s story “The Night Junior Seau Picked Up A Marine Captain’s Tab And Serenaded Bar Patrons With A Ukulele“.