Lo sentimos, la página que usted busca no se ha podido encontrar. Puede intentar su búsqueda de nuevo o visitar la lista de temas populares.

Global Open Science

Sarah Gund Prize for Research and Mentorship in Child Mental Health

Awarded each year in recognition of an outstanding contribution to child and adolescent psychiatry, psychology or developmental neuroscience.

Each year the Child Mind Institute Scientific Research Council selects an exceptional researcher for the Sarah Gund Prize for Research and Mentorship in Child Mental Health, in recognition of an outstanding contribution to child and adolescent psychiatry, psychology or developmental neuroscience. The award carries a prize of $25,000. The recipient is invited to present at the On the Shoulders of Giants scientific symposium held each October.

Past Honorees

2022 Sarah Gund Prize

Margaret (Peg) McCarthy, PhD was named one of Maryland’s Top 100 Women in 2009 and awarded the University of Maryland Researcher of the Year and Champion of Excellence in 2015 and 2017. More recently, Dr. McCarthy’s distinguished career was recognized with the awarding of the James and Carolyn Frenkil Dean’s Professorship.

2021 Sarah Gund Prize

Yasmin Hurd, PhD is the Ward-Coleman Chair of Translational Neuroscience and the Director of the Addiction Institute at Mount Sinai and the winner of our Sarah Gund Prize for Research and Mentorship in Child Mental Health.

2020 Sarah Gund Prize

W. Tom Boyce, MD, is a leading expert on the interplay between neurobiological and psychosocial processes — an interplay that leads to socially partitioned differences in childhood health, development and disease.

2019 Sarah Gund Prize

John Weisz, PhD has received multiple scientific awards, including the James McKeen Cattell Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Psychological Science—APS’s highest honor—for work that blends “relevance and rigor,” and “has had a profound impact on the field of psychological science over the past quarter century.

2018 Sarah Gund Prize

Felton Earls, MD, is the inaugural recipient of the Child Mind Institute’s Sarah Gund Prize for Research and Mentorship in Child Mental Health.

2017 Sarah Gund Prize

Kenneth A. Dodge, PhD, is the Pritzker Professor of Public Policy and Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University, where he founded the Center for Child and Family Policy.

2016 Sarah Gund Prize

John Rubenstein, MD, PhD, is the Nina Ireland Distinguished Professor in Child Psychiatry at the Nina Ireland Laboratory of Developmental Neurobiology, and Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco.

2015 Sarah Gund Prize

Thomas R. Insel, MD, served as director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the component of the National Institutes of Health charged with generating the knowledge needed to understand, treat and prevent mental disorders.

2014 Sarah Gund Prize

Pasko Rakic, MD, PhD, received his medical and graduate degrees in developmental biology and genetics from Belgrade University (former Yugoslavia), where he became assistant professor until being offered a faculty position at Harvard Medical School.

2013 Sarah Gund Prize

Nora Volkow, MD, is the director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Dr. Volkow’s work has been instrumental in demonstrating that drug addiction is a disease of the human brain. As a research psychiatrist and scientist, Dr. Volkow pioneered the use of brain imaging to investigate the toxic effects and addictive properties of abusable drugs.

2012 Sarah Gund Prize

Eric R. Kandel, MD, is University Professor at Columbia, Fred Kavli Professor and Director, Kavli Institute for Brain Science, and a senior investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

2011 Sarah Gund Prize

Judith Rapoport, MD, has dedicated her life’s work to advancing the understanding of childhood psychiatric disorders and seeking new and better treatments.

Jerome Kagan, PhD, a member of Harvard’s faculty for 40 years, has devoted himself to the study of how temperament emerges and develops in the first decade of life.